CST Colloquium 4/21 and 4/8

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[category, uc davis events]

Thursday, April 21, 2016

4:00pm, 3201 Hart Hall

A talk by Maryam S. Griffin, Ph.D., UC Presidential Postdoc

"REPRESENTATIONS OF PALESTINIAN TRANSIT AS DECOLONIZATION"

In this talk I ask whether unfettered public transportation can contribute to the decolonization of Palestine or whether a freely functioning transit system relies on decolonization as a pre-requisite. I do so in order to illuminate the potential role in the ongoing Palestinian struggle for self-determination. I argue that Palestinian mobility via public transportation constitutes a powerful form of quotidian resistance against the Israeli occupation forces, whose program of movement restrictions seeks to separate Palestinian communities from one another. Second, I consider the role that freedom of movement might play in decolonizing the Palestinian homeland. To do so, I rely on the work of artists who feature imaginative engagements with mobility and transit to think through the effects of freedom of movement on self-determination and sociality.

Thursday, April 28, 2016

4:00pm, 3201 Hart Hall

Jamila Moore Pewu Ph.D., CSU Fullerton

"PLANNING FOR THE CITY THAT IS, WHILE REMEMBERING THE CITY THAT WAS: BRIDGEPORT’S LITTLE LIBERIA IN THE 21ST CENTURY"

In 1841 W.P. Johnson wrote, "Bridgeport is a handsome place, and the people know how to entertain strangers. I think the [Colored Temperance] Convention next year ought to be held there again, as I do not think that it was generally known." Indeed, the story of how blacks and Native Americans from Connecticut, Virginia, Maryland, New York and the West Indies transformed an isolated, and undesirable part of town into a thriving "peri-urban multiethnic enclave," in the early nineteenth century is generally not known to many. The lack of historical data on this free community of color has rendered its legacies of freedom, entrepreneurship, and cultural innovation invisible to our present landscape, and Bridgeport’s South End is mired in legacies of postindustrial decline. However, by conjuring Little Liberia’s epic relationship between architecture and freedom, we can (re)create a historically sustainable community that exercises the past in the service of the future. This talk documents ongoing efforts by various stakeholders, to literally build upon the architectural footprint of Little Liberia to help envision a new future for the city’s South End. In addition, it will discuss how a grounded theory of spatial reappropriation along with a community centered research praxis, creates an alternative blueprint for how planners, historians, residents and architects negotiate heritage, city planning and development in the twenty-first century. Finally, it endorses the idea that when it comes to redevelopment, black lives, past, present and future should matter, and thus poses the question, how can we plan for the city that is, while remembering the city that was?

~Amanda Dunham

Asian American Studies Program Coordinator

Cultural Studies Graduate Program Coordinator

Hart Interdisciplinary Programs

3102 Hart Hall

Phone: 530-752-2069

Fax: 530-752-9260

4.21.16 MG.pdf
4.28.16 JMP.pdf