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Unsettling Performance Studies with Support from UCD Native American Studies and Studio Art present:

POSTCOMMODITY
Date: Wednesday February 17, 2016
When: 5-7 pm
Where: Della Davidson Dance Studio (beside the Nelson Gallery)

Hacking the Coordinates: Positionality and the Repellent Fence

Postcommodity is an interdisciplinary arts collective composed of Raven Chacon, Cristóbal Martínez, and Kade L. Twist (2015 USA Art fellow) and based in the southwestern United States. The collective operates through a shared indigenous lens that engages the assaultive manifestations of the global market. Postcommodity works to forge new metaphors to rationalize our shared experiences within an increasingly challenging contemporary environment. Through indigenous narratives of cultural self-determination, Postcommodity pushes back against the ever-increasing velocities and complex forms of violence that have colonized the 21st century.

postcommodity.com

They will present a talk on their Piece called Repellent Fence:

Repellent Fence – 2015.

Land art installation and community engagement (Earth, cinder block, para-cord, pvc spheres, helium).

Installation view, US/Mexico Border, Douglas, Arizona / Agua Prieta, Sonora.

The Repellent Fence is a social collaborative project among individuals, communities, institutional organizations, publics, and sovereigns that culminate with the establishment of a large-scale temporary monument located near Douglas, Arizona and Agua Prieta, Sonora. This 2 mile long ephemeral land-art installation is comprised of 26 tethered balloons, that are each 10 feet in diameter, and float 50 feet above the desert landscape. The balloons that comprise Repellent Fence are enlarged replicas of an ineffective bird repellent product. Coincidently, these balloons use indigenous medicine colors and iconography — the same graphic used by indigenous peoples from South America to Canada for thousands of years. The purpose of this monument is to bi-directionally reach across the U.S./Mexico border as a suture that stitches the peoples of the Americas together—symbolically demonstrating the interconnectedness of the Western Hemisphere by recognizing the land, indigenous peoples, history, relationships, movement and communication.