digitalculturesnews Mellon Sawyer Seminar on Surveillance Democracies Presents Prof. Kelly Gates (UC San Diego) on Policing Images

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The Mellon Sawyer Seminar on Surveillance Democracies is delighted to present this week’s speaker:

Policing Images: Video Evidence and Its Expert Witnesses
Kelly Gates | Professor of Communication and Science Studies, University of California, San Diego

Tuesday, January 26, 2016

Location: UC Davis School of Law, King Hall Rm 1301
Time: 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

Abstract: Recorded visual media are the most prolific form of evidence in the legal system today, given the avalanche of images generated from an expanding array of sources: camera phones, laptop cameras, body-worn cameras, closed-circuit television systems, satellites, camera-mounted drones and manned aircraft. From investigations of petty street crime to major human rights violations, traces captured in video recordings promise to provide evidence for establishing factual accounts and building ironclad legal cases. Of course, visual media rarely stand on their own as self-evident incrimination or exoneration, and the evidentiary value of images continues to depend on much that is external to images themselves. In this talk, Gates considers the field of forensic video analysis as a key site for understanding the problems of visual evidence in the context of an unprecedented proliferation of visual media. She uses cases and interviews with forensic video analysts to explore the complex issues arising in this field, and to discuss the efforts of this emerging community of expertise to define its boundaries and authority.

Bio: Kelly Gates’ research focuses on the critical analysis of digital media technologies. Her main emphasis has been the politics and social implications of computerization, and particularly the automation of surveillance, in the United States from the mid-twentieth century to the present.

Her 2011 book, Our Biometric Future: Facial Recognition Technology and the Culture of Surveillance, explores the effort underway since the 1960s to teach computers to see the human face. The book examines the social construction of automated facial recognition and automated facial expression analysis, focusing on the conceptual and cultural frameworks that are used to think about these technologies, and on the constellations of interests, institutions and social practices that are shaping their development. Gates argues that, despite persistent claims that computers have no social bias, in fact there is no such thing as a computer vision program that can “see” faces in a culturally neutral way. It is especially important to recognize this, because the face has been a special object of attention in the organization of visual practices and the development of visual media technologies, and technologies designed for representing and analyzing the face have played a central role in defining and redefining what it means to be human.

Gates is currently working on a new project that investigates the emerging professional field of video forensics and its attendant technologies in order to examine the ways in which new visual imaging and archiving technologies are being incorporated into, and transforming, modern investigatory and evidentiary practices. She is especially interested in the emerging forms that police work is taking in the digital economy, including the cultural labor that the police perform in their roles as surveillance workers and media analysts.

UPCOMING EVENTS

Please visit our website for more information about our speakers and event updates.

Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Security Theology, Surveillance and the Politics of Fear
Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian | Lawrence D. Biele Chair in Law at the Faculty of Law-Institute of Criminology and the School of Social Work and Public Welfare
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Location: UC Davis School of Law, King Hall Rm 1301

Time: 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

Abstract: Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian’s latest work is an examination of Palestinian experiences of life and death within the context of Israeli settler colonialism, broadening the analytical horizon to include those who “keep on existing” and explores how Israeli theologies and ideologies of security, surveillance and fear can obscure violence and power dynamics while perpetuating existing power structures. Drawing from everyday aspects of Palestinian victimization, survival, life and death, and moving between the local and the global, Shalhoub-Kevorkian introduces and defines her notion of “Israeli security theology” and the politics of fear. She relies on a feminist analysis, invoking the intimate politics of the everyday and centering the Palestinian body, family life, memory and memorialization, birth and death as critical sites from which to examine the settler colonial state’s machineries of surveillance which produce and maintain a political economy of fear that justifies colonial violence.

Bio: Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian is the Lawrence D. Biele Professor of Law at the Faculty of Law-Institute of Criminology and the School of Social Work and Public Welfare at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She is a longtime anti-violence, native Palestinian feminist activist and the director of the Gender Studies Program at Mada al-Carmel, the Arab Center for Applied Social Research in Haifa. Her research focuses on law, society and crimes of abuse of power. She studies the crime of femicide and other forms of gendered violence, crimes of abuse of power in settler colonial contexts, surveillance, securitization and social control, and trauma and recovery in militarized and colonized zones. Shalhoub-Kevorkian’s most recent book is entitled: Militarization and Violence Against Women in Conflict Zones in the Middle East: The Palestinian Case Study published by Cambridge University Press, 2010. Her upcoming book is entitled: Security Theology, Surveillance and the Politics of Fear, published by Cambridge University Press. She has published articles in multi-disciplinary fields including British Journal of Criminology, International Review of Victimology, Feminism and Psychology, Middle East Law and Governance, International Journal of Lifelong Education, American Behavioral Scientist Journal,Social Service Review, Violence Against Women, Journal of Feminist Family Therapy: An International Forum, Social Identities, Social Science and Medicine, Signs, Law & Society Review, and more. As a resident of the old city of Jerusalem, Shalhoub-Kevorkian is a prominent local activist. She engages in direct actions and critical dialogue to end the inscription of power over Palestinian children’s lives, spaces of death, and women’s birthing bodies and lives.

Shalhoub-Kevorkian received an M.A. in 1989 and a Ph.D. in 1994 from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She has been visiting law professor at UCLA and USC, and is also a lecturer in the Faculty of Social Work. Shalhoub-Kevorkian is a criminologist and specialist in human rights and women’s rights. She consulted with Human Rights Watch on its most recent report on violence against Palestinian women in Israel and with the UNIFEM division of the United Nations.

Tuesday, February 23, 2016

Democracy in an Era of Mass Surveillance
Ben Wizner | Director of the Speech, Privacy & Technology Project
American Civil Liberty Union
Location: UC Davis School of Law, King Hall Rm 1301

Time: 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Surveillance after Snowden: How Much Has Changed?
Shane Kadidal | Senior Managing Attorney
Center for Constitutional Rights
Location: UC Davis School of Law, King Hall Rm 1301
Time: 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

Tuesday, March 8, 2016

The Benefits and Costs of Information Privacy Federalism
Paul Schwartz | Jefferson E. Peyser Professor of Law
Berkeley Law School
Location: UC Davis School of Law, King Hall Rm 1301
Time: 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

Wednesday, March 9. 2016

How Anonymous (Narrowly) Evaded the Cyberterrorism Rhetorical Machine
Gabriella Coleman | Wolfe Chair in Scientific and Technological Literacy
McGill University
Location: UC Davis School of Law, King Hall Rm 1301
Time: 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

Tuesday, March 29, 2016

Great Exploitations: Data Mining, Technological Determinism and the NSA
Matthew L. Jones | James R. Barker Professor of Contemporary Civilization
Columbia University
Location: UC Davis School of Law, King Hall Rm 1301
Time: 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

Tuesday, April 5, 2016

Angry Eyes: the God-Trick and Geographies of Militarized Vision
Derek Gregory | Peter Wall Distinguished Professor
University of British Columbia in Vancouver
Location: UC Davis School of Law, King Hall Rm 1301
Time: 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

Tuesday, April 12, 2016

Surveillance in India
Chinmayi Arun | Research Director, Centre for Communication Governance
National Law University, Delhi
Location: UC Davis School of Law, King Hall Rm 1301
Time: 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

Tuesday, April 19, 2016

American Spies: Modern Surveillance Under U.S. Law
Jennifer Granick | Director of Civil Liberties
Stanford Center for Internet & Society
Location: UC Davis School of Law, King Hall Rm 1301

Time: 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

You Are a Hedge Fund
Kim Stanley Robinson | American Writer, Author of the Mars Trilogy
Location: UC Davis School of Law, King Hall Rm 1301
Time: 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

All best,

Uyen

Uyen P. Le

Mellon Sawyer Postdoctoral Fellow, Seminar on Surveillance Democracies

University of California, Davis School of Law

SurveillanceDemocracies-Spring2016.pdf